The Official Selection Films of the 4th Annual Motorcycle Film Festival

July 27, 2016

2016 Official Selection

4th Annual 2016 Official Selections

Feature Narrative

21 Days Under The Sky
Liza Liza Skies Are Grey

How to be deadly

Short Narrative

Dream
Lone Rider
Motorbike Jazz
Tread
Vintage Steele, A Day In The Life

Feature Documentary

Arrows Of Fire
How to be deadly
Klocked: Women With Horsepower
Mancini, The Motorcycle Wizard
Motonomad II: Riders Of The Steppe
Now I Will Arrive
Take None Give None
That’s All Mine
The Indian Wrecking Crew

Short Documentary

A.K.A Brokentooth – Canada’s Ice Road Biker
Built Not Bought – A Motorcycle Story – Cafe Racer Dreams
Chasing The Bullett
Hell Rider – Deadly Barrel
Holy Mother of the Races
Janus Motorcycles
Keino
Night Riding
No Highway
Quake City Rumblers // 50cc Christchurch
Richie Pan Forever
Ride On United
Robin’s Road Trip
Sabie Bubble Run
The Monkey And Her Driver
The Weekend Pass
Today We Ride
Virginia’s Harley: A Girl’s Bike

Experimental

Blue Prints
Boutonniere
Motos In Moab Vol 2
Sparks Fly
The Build
The FN Four
Wheels

 All films will play between September 14-17th 2016

at The Gutter, Williamsburg Brooklyn 11211.

Film screening times and tickets on sale ON THE WEBSITE!


Checking in with Cat Bruce – Vincent Black Lightning

July 20, 2016

Cat Bruce won the Short Narrative award at the 2nd annual MFF for her film Vincent Black Lightning, an animated film that follows the heartwarming yet tragic love story of Red Molly and James, A film about love, motorbikes, and a redheaded girl. Read all about Cat and the MFF award winning film here: http://motorcyclefilmfestival.com/vincent-black-lightning/.

Vincent Black Lightning will be screened at Petrolettes festival in Berlin July 29-31 2016 as part of an MFF films from the female perspective, so we took a few minutes to check in with Cat.

MFF: What new projects do you have in the works?

CB: After making Vincent Black Lightning, I went on to make a number of promotional animations, including a music video for a band called STRAW: vimeo.com/102508143. Following that, I made a short animated film called No Place like Home, focusing on a woman dealing with the threat of eviction. The trailer can be seen here: vimeo.com/154026285. I’m currently working on a few projects including another music video, and a promotional animation for a company I’ve worked for many times, called Black Cow Vodka, who make Vodka from the milk of grass grazed cows in West Dorset, England.

MFF: How did you find out about the MFF?

CB: I just happened to come across the festival online after making Vincent Black Lightning (an animated music promo) for musician Ewan Robertson in 2014.

MFF: Have you attended the MFF?

CB: I have not attended! I would have loved to, but as I live in Scotland, it would have been a very big trip, but maybe I will go another year!

MFF: How did you get into making films?

CB: I went to Edinburgh College of Art, and originally wanted to take the sculpture course. In my first year, I tried out all sorts of stuff, and after creating an animation, I fell in love with it and decided to do my degree in animation, which lead in to freelance animation jobs and making my own films.

MFF: Was making motorcycle films always an interest, or was this film an exception in your work?

CB: It was an exception, however, I have been inspired and may venture back into the animated realm of motorcycles.

MFF: Do you ride motorcycles?

CB: I do not ride motorcycles, however I don’t drive either. I’ve always thought that if I was going to use any vehicle, it would be a motorbike, but I haven’t gotten round to it yet. So I cycle a pedal bike and make engine noises with my mouth in the meantime.
MFF: Is there anything you’d like to say as a woman filmmaker of a motorcycle themed film specifically?

CB: It was a great fun film to make. For me, when I think of motorcycles, I get a sense of freedom and adventure, which is something that as a female filmmaker, really resonates. As a filmmaker, you should be adventurous in what you are making, and you have the freedom to show people how you see the world. This is an important thing to remember, especially when at the moment, there are far fewer well known female filmmakers than males. The male point of view can dominate media, and that is why it is so significant to encourage female filmmakers and filmmakers from any other minority group; so we can see that there is more than one perspective, more than one way to live, more than one way to have an adventure, and more than one way to be free.

MFF: Anything else you’d like to add?

CB: I grew up in the highlands of Scotland, where we have a yearly Harley-Davidson festival called Thunder in the Glens, and I remember as a kid I really looked forward to it. Hundreds (or what seemed like hundreds) of folk from all over the world on Harleys, and other motorbikes would ride through all the wee highland villages, until they got to Aviemore where there was music and food. And it was so loud, it really did sound like thunder. It’s quite a poignant memory, watching and hearing these big thunderous and super cool motorcycles roaring past as a small kid. So it probably has positively affected the way in which I see motorcycles. Just thought I should give it a shout out.